2017 May Be a Job Seeker's Market, But Your Resume Is Still Only a Tool and Not a Golden Ticket
2017 May Be a Job Seeker's Market, But Your Resume Is Still Only a Tool and Not a Golden Ticket
May 15, 2017
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As an executive resume writer I could tell you that a well-written, compelling resume is the golden ticket to make all of your career dreams come true. But then I wouldn’t be a very honest resume writer. Frankly, I’m surprised how many job seekers are under the false assumption that if they just had the perfect resume they’d be able to have the luxury of choosing between job offers, employers would be banging down their door begging them to come work for them, and they’d make three times their current salary.

Sure, there may be the occasional client that this happens to after uploading their resume to one job board or applying to only three jobs online. But the truth is that there are more factors at play in the success of your job search than JUST YOUR RESUME. And these kinds of results—although a resume writer’s vision for all of their job-seeking clients is for their dreams to come true—are not typical.

Listen, your job search success—the amount of time it takes to find that great new role and how many responses you receive for interviews—depends on what you DO with your resume. You can’t upload it to Monster.com and apply to 10 jobs on Indeed.com and expect the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow to land in your lap.

Is it a job seeker’s market? Yes.

Will you have a shorter job search than in years past, with more options than five years ago? Probably.

But you still have to put in the effort to JOB SEARCH.

So, what does an effective job search look like?


It looks like:

-Not depending on Monster, Indeed or {insert job board name here} to do the job for you. Job boards are a resource, but not the only one.

-Realizing that a resume is a tool in your job search arsenal and not the end all, be all of your search.

-Networking in earnest. Consistently. BEFORE you start actively job searching—and especially during your active job search.

-Researching employers, finding the right culture fit, and then specifically targeting and reaching out to those employers as part of your job search.

-Seeking out referrals. Employee referrals are the #1 way hiring managers are finding candidates—and they account for 48% of new hires according to a recent survey by LinkedIn.

-Asking for and going to informational interviews to seek out the opinions and expertise of those who’ve walked the road before you. It opens doors.

-Finding out what the hidden job market really is and how you can be accessing it.

-Knowing where recruiters are searching and making sure you have a presence there, and that your online presence represents your brand and career accomplishments well.

An effective and successful job search is a well-rounded one. Just like your investment portfolio shouldn’t have all its “eggs in one basket”, neither should your job search. Do not leave the future of your career up to Monster, Indeed, a recruiter distribution, resume blast, or LinkedIn alone. Diversify your job search efforts. Be realistic. Educate yourself about job searching, interviewing, negotiating a salary, the hidden job market, and applicant tracking software. Do your research. Become a student of job searching and learn how to present yourself in today’s job market. This is especially important if you haven’t searched in several years. Things change.

Please don’t be one of the many job seekers who believe a resume is the only thing you need to have a successful job search and land that next great role. You’ll end up frustrated and disappointed. And probably blame your resume. As much as I’d love for a professionally written resume to be the answer to make all of your career dreams come true, it just isn’t the reality of job searching—and I want you to have a short job search! One that results in more interviews than you can feasibly accept, with great companies you’ve always wanted to work for, who make you offers that you have a hard time choosing between. If you want that too, then you have to educate yourself on HOW to job search and then put in the time and effort to search.